Wireless networks – Through Walls http://throughwalls.net/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 18:14:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://throughwalls.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-9-150x150.png Wireless networks – Through Walls http://throughwalls.net/ 32 32 SIP, backed by Alphabet, acquires Dense Air for wireless networks https://throughwalls.net/sip-backed-by-alphabet-acquires-dense-air-for-wireless-networks/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 18:14:42 +0000 https://throughwalls.net/sip-backed-by-alphabet-acquires-dense-air-for-wireless-networks/ Dense Air is pleased to announce that it has entered into a definitive agreement for its acquisition by Sidewalk Infrastructure Partners (SIP). The company will operate under SIP CoFi innovation platform, which aims to make connectivity more open, shared and inclusive through public-private partnerships (P3). With Dense Air’s spectrum assets, public-private partnerships and track record […]]]>

Dense Air is pleased to announce that it has entered into a definitive agreement for its acquisition by Sidewalk Infrastructure Partners (SIP). The company will operate under SIP CoFi innovation platform, which aims to make connectivity more open, shared and inclusive through public-private partnerships (P3). With Dense Air’s spectrum assets, public-private partnerships and track record of expanding connectivity, this acquisition will accelerate Dense Air’s mission to deliver cost-effective 4G and 5G solutions and to densify and expand networks. mobile devices to support a range of use cases, including mobile broadband, IoT, public safety, first responder networks, and distance learning.

SIP’s CoFi platform is focused on building a shared wireless infrastructure, in partnership with cities, that delivers better profitability for broadband operators and better connectivity for users. Today’s broadband can be improved with recent technological advancements, including improvements in radio access networks (RANs), the introduction of open standards, virtualization, and software-defined networks. Together, these technologies can help create a ubiquitous, shared “host neutral” infrastructure. Instead of operators fighting to build networks on top of networks and only benefit those who are already connected, CoFi believes that this infrastructure of the future can bring value to all stakeholders while advancing l equity in broadband access.

Dense Air builds, owns and operates secure and shared “small cell” networks that effectively enhance and extend traditional “macro” networks built by legacy mobile network operators. Small cells, deployed inconspicuously on streetlights or rooftops, provide high-speed, high-performance cellular coverage over hundreds or thousands of feet. A small cellular network supports better coverage closer to the user, complementing macrocells by alleviating network congestion and reaching areas where macroservice deteriorates.

Dense Air’s unique technology allows multiple network operators to securely share the same infrastructure, reducing costs for service providers and municipalities while providing high-speed connectivity? An approach in line with CoFi’s shared “host neutral” infrastructure. Dense Air’s network of small cells enables multiple carriers to operate more efficiently in underserved areas, safely sharing the resources of a single small cell. It is a solution that improves the economics of deployment and operations for operators, reduces total infrastructure requirements and ultimately provides more choice for consumers.

“Ubiquitous connectivity is crucial for modern life,” said Jonathan Winer, co-CEO of SIP. “By expanding Internet access and opening previously uncompetitive markets in partnership with new and existing service providers, we can provide consumers with more transparent and affordable coverage. We look forward to partnering with service providers, local governments and other stakeholders to understand the unique needs of each community we operate in. Like any other type of infrastructure, broadband does not have a one-size-fits-all solution.

“The densification of cellular networks to complete the deployment of 5G gigabit services is a huge global challenge, both technical and business,” said Paul Senior, Founder and CEO of Dense Air. “Our unique shared infrastructure enables communities and operators to create future-proof radio networks that are economically attractive and help solve the digital divide issues that plague today’s 5G network constructions. For mobile network operators, Dense Air’s technology enables efficient, economically attractive and robust enhancement and extension of the network. When paired with the CoFi P3 model, our technology becomes a powerful tool in bridging the digital divide through sustainable, community-centric fixed wireless networks. ”

SIP and Dense Air will soon announce an inaugural U.S.-based project that involves partnering with cities to increase coverage of high-speed wireless connectivity, with a focus on expanding access to generally poor communities. served, such as students without home connectivity.

Dense air


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How the autonomous vehicle shapes our future wireless networks https://throughwalls.net/how-the-autonomous-vehicle-shapes-our-future-wireless-networks/ Wed, 15 Dec 2021 02:37:19 +0000 https://throughwalls.net/how-the-autonomous-vehicle-shapes-our-future-wireless-networks/ Over the past decade, engineers across the automotive ecosystem have invested countless hours and capital in trying to teach cars to drive. Achieving this goal could mean an end to traffic accidents and fatalities and recouping the wasted time we spend in traffic. But teaching a machine to operate with greater safety, precision, and experience […]]]>

Over the past decade, engineers across the automotive ecosystem have invested countless hours and capital in trying to teach cars to drive. Achieving this goal could mean an end to traffic accidents and fatalities and recouping the wasted time we spend in traffic. But teaching a machine to operate with greater safety, precision, and experience than human drivers in an endless number of road, road and weather conditions is an incredibly difficult problem.

Artificial intelligence (AI) technologies, leveraging vast improvements in the cost and availability of massive computing and data storage and processing, make possible incredibly difficult challenges like driving a car. Today, as the complexity of our wireless networks faces a dramatic increase in complexity, engineers designing future wireless networks, like 6G, are rushing to apply AI technologies and techniques. similar design.

  • Design requirements and results: For today’s classically designed systems, the software in our networks encodes the functionality described in today’s wireless standards. For ML-driven cellular networks, we will need to move from a design that conforms to a set of human-written rules to a set of defined outcomes. In the automotive world, software and AI engineers define a set of constraints for their vehicles, called operational domain definitions (ODDs). For example, an autonomous vehicle might only travel on US highways during the day. They then train algorithms to optimize a specific goal within that SDG, such as minimizing the likelihood of an accident for a variety of different scenarios the vehicle might encounter, which might require the trade-off of breaking traffic rules or passenger comfort to optimize safety. As part of research into using AI for our cellular networks, we must have a conceptually similar set of domain goals and outcomes. For example, do we want our AI algorithms to optimize total throughput? Or the fastest response times? Or the reliability of the network? Or minimal power consumption?
  • Training data: To create AI algorithms, engineers use large data sets from a variety of real-world scenarios to teach or train the network – much like how humans learn tasks. In each data set, for a set of input conditions, we tell the algorithm what we think is the correct result. By introducing millions of different scenarios into the training phase, each with a correct result, we hope to teach the algorithm how to react. Today, automakers have spent hundreds of millions of dollars to acquire and label data sets for vehicles. Ultimately, the quality of the AI ​​algorithm strongly correlates with the quality of the datasets used to train it. The data sets needed to form wireless networks are still in their infancy. Cellular infrastructure companies with large deployed facilities can use their existing equipment to collect datasets for their own use. For small businesses, the National Science Foundation (NSF) is funding initiatives like RFDataFactory to create tools that will automate the generation and management of new community datasets for wireless research.
  • Open network software: To develop application-specific machine learning technology, it is essential to have open software platforms to experiment with. In the automotive industry, new research often begins with software like the open source Robot Operating System (ROS) or more focused, but more comprehensive, proprietary software stacks like the NVIDIA DRIVE AGX Pegasus platform. In wireless networks, the software ecosystem is, again, at an early stage. Open source tools like OpenAirInterface (OAI) software are evolving rapidly to gain the performance needed to be useful in real testing. As more proprietary and comprehensive software stacks begin to become available, tools are still fragmented and will need to evolve before achieving the ability to prototype and test the equivalent of a Layer 3 or higher stand-alone network.
  • Validation / test methods: The test of algorithms and ML systems is more complex than the test of conventionally programmed systems (conformity test). For autonomous vehicles, rapid advancements in software-in-the-loop, model-in-the-loop and hardware-in-the-loop methods have become crucial for testing these vehicles in the laboratory for the infinite set of road conditions. which they’ll face before these vehicles see a real-world test drive. Similar SIL, MIL and HIL technologies will also need to evolve for telecommunications testing. For example, Northeastern University recently demonstrated the use of the world’s largest RF network emulator, originally developed for DARPA, to test a new AI-based cellular network. Technology.

As our cellular networks continue to grow in their capabilities and complexities, engineers will increasingly turn to AI technologies. In many ways, network engineers will face design and validation challenges similar to those encountered by automotive engineers over the past decade. And while automotive engineers typically meet at different forums and conferences than wireless engineers, there is a substantial mutual benefit in these groups working together as they develop, validate, and implement. the potential of AI systems.


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ADRF over 5G, open RAN and indoor wireless networks https://throughwalls.net/adrf-over-5g-open-ran-and-indoor-wireless-networks/ Thu, 02 Dec 2021 14:05:30 +0000 https://throughwalls.net/adrf-over-5g-open-ran-and-indoor-wireless-networks/ A phrase often repeated in the wireless industry is that 80% of all smartphone use is indoors. The source of this statistic is difficult to trace, but many companies operating in the indoor wireless industry are taking it to heart. “Carriers are still spending a lot of investment in indoor and outdoor SAR [distributed antenna […]]]>

A phrase often repeated in the wireless industry is that 80% of all smartphone use is indoors. The source of this statistic is difficult to trace, but many companies operating in the indoor wireless industry are taking it to heart.

“Carriers are still spending a lot of investment in indoor and outdoor SAR [distributed antenna systems]”said Arnold Kim, ADRF COO. Kim’s comments on the subject carry some weight: He’s been ADRF’s COO for a decade, and the company dates back twice as long.

All the while, ADRF has focused on building wireless networks inside buildings, which often rely on DAS equipment as well as repeaters and other types of radio equipment. According to Kim, there have been a lot of changes in the industry over the two decades of ADRF ?? but the importance of accessing indoor internet connections has only grown.

ADRF sells a range of radio equipment, including the ADXD series DAS.
(Source: ADRF)

Perhaps one of the most significant changes over the past 20 years is the makeup of ADRF’s clients. Kim said that when the company started, only large network operators like Verizon were paying to install DAS systems in large buildings like hotels and sports arenas. “It was a simpler time,” Kim recalls.

But it’s different now. “There was a recognition that in the building [wireless networks] was an incredibly important space for businesses to invest in, ”Kim explained. He said large wireless network operators like AT&T still pay for DAS systems inside some large buildings, but a major source of ADRF’s current revenue mix now comes from the building owners themselves. . After all, smartphones are so ubiquitous today that the lack of a cellular connection indoors is a concern for most people, whether they are sports fans in a stadium or white-collar workers inside a stadium. corporate campus.

“The business sector is incredibly robust,” Kim said, explaining that there are approximately 6 to 8 million commercial buildings in the United States today and only a small percentage operate indoor DAS networks.

Another change in the industry that Kim pointed out: Indoor wireless systems aren’t necessarily prohibitive. “It’s something that we fight every day of the week and twice on Sunday,” Kim said, saying ADRF’s new DAS offerings are affordable for most large companies, especially given the importance of having interior cellular connections. “It is much, much more profitable.”

But these are not the only factors that motivate ADRF’s activities. Kim said a major new source of attention within the company was private wireless networks ?? networks owned and operated by a utility, business or other customer. Indeed, ADRF recently announced that it would support Anterix ?? a major emerging player in the private wireless network industry ?? with his equipment.

“Private LTE is a great pilot,” Kim said.

However, the same can’t be said for open RAN, according to Kim. “I think it’s still a long way from maturity,” he said of the technology, which promises to allow operators to mix and match products from various vendors through hardware interfaces. standardized. “It’s exciting. This is the future. But it’s very early.”

Kim said ADRF is investing in the open RAN space but doesn’t expect to support the technology anytime soon.

Finally, Kim said 5G is becoming a major talking point for ADRF. “5G is incredibly relevant to us,” he said. After all, a large portion of ADRF’s existing customer base uses 4G networks that will eventually need to be upgraded to 5G. “It is something very necessary.”

“It’s going to take ten years,” Kim said of the 5G upgrade process for indoor networks. “It’s still very new.”

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?? Mike Dano, Editorial Director, 5G and Mobile Strategies, Light reading | @mikeddano



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Scientists are developing wireless networks that all https://throughwalls.net/scientists-are-developing-wireless-networks-that-all/ Thu, 25 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://throughwalls.net/scientists-are-developing-wireless-networks-that-all/ image: Image: World Wide Control of Neural System: Remote control of brain circuits via the Internet. seen Following Credit: KAIST A new study shows that researchers can remotely control the brain circuits of many animals simultaneously and independently via the Internet. Scientists believe that this newly developed technology can accelerate brain research and various neuroscience […]]]>

image: Image: World Wide Control of Neural System: Remote control of brain circuits via the Internet.
seen Following

Credit: KAIST

A new study shows that researchers can remotely control the brain circuits of many animals simultaneously and independently via the Internet. Scientists believe that this newly developed technology can accelerate brain research and various neuroscience studies to uncover basic brain functions as well as the foundations of various neuropsychiatric and neurological disorders.

A multidisciplinary team of researchers from KAIST, the University of Washington in St. Louis, and the University of Colorado in Boulder, have created a wireless ecosystem with its own wireless implantable devices and Internet of Things (IoT) infrastructure. to enable high-speed neuroscience experiments over the Internet. This innovative technology could allow scientists to manipulate the brains of animals anywhere in the world. The study was published in the journal Nature Biomedical Engineering November 25

“This new technology is highly versatile and adaptive. It can remotely control many neural implants and laboratory tools in real time or in a programmed manner without direct human interactions, ”said Professor Jae-Woong Jeong of KAIST School of Electrical Engineering and lead author of the study. . “These wireless neural devices and equipment integrated with IoT technology have enormous potential for science and medicine.”

The wireless ecosystem only requires a minicomputer that can be purchased for under $ 45, which connects to the internet and communicates with wireless multifunctional brain probes or other types of conventional lab equipment using modules. IoT control. By optimally integrating the versatility and modular construction of unique IoT hardware and software within a single ecosystem, this wireless technology offers new applications that have not previously been demonstrated by a single stand-alone technology. This includes, but is not limited to, minimalist hardware, global remote access, selective and scheduled experiences, customizable automation, and high-speed scalability.

“As long as researchers have access to the Internet, they can trigger, customize, stop, validate and store the results of large experiments anytime and from anywhere in the world. They can remotely perform large-scale neuroscience experiments on animals deployed in multiple countries, ”said lead author Dr. Raza Qazi, a researcher at KAIST and the University of Colorado at Boulder. “The low cost of this system allows it to be easily adopted and can fuel innovation in many laboratories,” added Dr. Qazi.

One of the important advantages of this IoT neurotechnology is its ability to be mass-deployed across the world due to its minimalist hardware, low installation cost, ease of use, and customizable versatility. Scientists around the world can quickly implement this technology in their existing labs with minimal budget concerns to achieve globally remote access, scalable experimental automation, or both, potentially reducing the time it takes to solve various neuroscientific challenges such as those associated with intractable neurological conditions.

Another lead author of the study, Professor Jordan McCall of the Department of Anesthesiology and Center for Clinical Pharmacology at Washington University in St. Louis, said the technology has the potential to change the way studies fundamental neuroscience is performed. “One of the biggest limitations when trying to understand how the mammalian brain works is that we have to study these functions under unnatural conditions. This technology brings us one step closer to doing important studies without interaction. direct human contact with the study subjects. ”

The ability to schedule experiments remotely tends to automate these types of experiments. Dr Kyle Parker, instructor at Washington University in St. Louis and other lead author of the study, added, “This experimental automation can potentially help us reduce the number of animals used in biomedical research by reducing the number of animals used in biomedical research. the variability introduced by various experimenters. This is especially important given our moral imperative to seek out research designs that enable this reduction. “

Researchers believe this wireless technology may open up new opportunities for many applications, including brain research, pharmaceuticals, and telemedicine to remotely treat diseases of the brain and other organs. This remote automation technology could become even more valuable when many labs have to shut down, such as at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.

This work was supported by grants from the KAIST Global Singularity Research Program, the National Research Foundation of Korea, the National Institute of Health in the United States, and associated universities in Oak Ridge.

About KAIST

KAIST is Korea’s first and best science and technology university. KAIST was established in 1971 by the Korean government to train scientists and engineers committed to industrialization and economic growth in Korea.

Since then, KAIST and its 67,000 graduates have been the gateway to advanced science and technology, innovation and entrepreneurship. KAIST has become one of the most innovative universities with more than 10,000 students enrolled in five colleges and seven schools, including 1,039 international students from 90 countries.

On the brink of its half-century in 2021, KAIST continues to strive for a better world through its activities in education, research, entrepreneurship and globalization. For more information on KAIST, please visit http://www.kaist.ac.kr/.


Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of any press releases posted on EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information via the EurekAlert system.


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5GB SMART, bringing wireless networks into the intelligent and autonomous era https://throughwalls.net/5gb-smart-bringing-wireless-networks-into-the-intelligent-and-autonomous-era/ Wed, 03 Nov 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://throughwalls.net/5gb-smart-bringing-wireless-networks-into-the-intelligent-and-autonomous-era/ PARTNER CONTENT: At the 4th Wireless Autonomous Driving Network Industry Forum, Ma Hongbo, Chairman of Huawei Wireless SingleOSS Product Line, delivered a keynote address titled “5GB SMART, Bringing Wireless Networks into the Intelligent and Autonomous Era “. The forum was held as part of the 12th Global Mobile Broadband Forum. In his speech, Mr. Ma […]]]>

PARTNER CONTENT: At the 4th Wireless Autonomous Driving Network Industry Forum, Ma Hongbo, Chairman of Huawei Wireless SingleOSS Product Line, delivered a keynote address titled “5GB SMART, Bringing Wireless Networks into the Intelligent and Autonomous Era “. The forum was held as part of the 12th Global Mobile Broadband Forum. In his speech, Mr. Ma highlighted the importance of network autonomy for 5G operators, predicting five key areas of evolution for wireless networks: Simplified, Maximizing, Agile, Robust and Thoughtful (5Gb SMART). These changes will result in autonomous driving networks with automated operation and maintenance, ultimate performance and a low carbon footprint.

Operators focus on autonomous driving networks

Over the past decade, the evolution of wireless networks has brought new opportunities as well as increased complexity of network OPEX and O&M. With 5G, the mobile communications industry is promoting the concept of autonomous driving networks by integrating wireless networks with intelligence.
During the conference, Mr. Ma explained that operators are gradually and hierarchically implementing autonomous driving networks as a basic strategy. In fact, according to a study conducted by TMF Autonomous Networks in 2021, more than 80% of 42 operators surveyed independently believe they will deploy a fully autonomous driving network at scale in the next decade.

5Go SMART: five trends for wireless autonomous driving networks

Wireless autonomous driving networks will integrate both network and site intelligence, developing independent intelligence processes and gradually evolving towards intelligent autonomy.

Trend 1 GB simplified: Network construction will become smarter and simpler throughout its lifecycle. Intelligence will be introduced into sites, facilitating intelligent detection and simplified site configuration, much like adding “eyes” and a “brain”. The intelligence of networks and base stations will work together to adapt to a variety of contexts, resulting in self-configuration of the network and intelligent acceptance of ancillary sites. Ultimately, the entire network construction lifecycle will be simplified.

Trend 2 GB Maximize: Vertical collaboration will maximize the potential of the network. Intelligence will also be introduced into the air interface, along with the use of technologies, such as channel graph and planning dictionary, for more flexible resource planning and spectrum decoupling, thereby maximizing the performance of the network. ‘one site. The network will use 3D beam planning and intelligent parameter optimization to maximize performance across all frequency bands. In addition to improved performance and experience, the network will balance and maximize network energy efficiency using energy saving technologies at the site, device and network layers.

3 Go Agile Trend: The whole process of 5G services will become more agile. Today, every industry requires better network construction and maintenance than in the past. Thus, intelligence will be introduced in the planning, construction, maintenance and optimization phases of toB networks. This will result in automatic translation of service intentions, precise intelligent network planning and proactive service assurance, making 5GtoB service deployment more agile.

Trend 4 GB Robust: 5G networks will become more reliable. Intelligence capabilities, such as self-learning of fault functions and intelligent analysis of time sequences, will be introduced to implement precise fault identification and intelligent root cause analysis. This will turn manual troubleshooting into automatic, implement failure prediction and prevention, shift from passive response to proactive maintenance, improve network robustness, and ultimately create more reliable 5G networks.

Trend 5 GB Think: 5G networks will be able to “think”. Together, site and network intelligence will become the basis for wireless autonomous driving networks. Base stations will gradually become intelligent, creating digital twins. They will also have a per-device federated learning capability to add intelligence to each terminal. The powerful computing capacity of the wireless intelligent engine will be able to self-learn and self-evolve using massive network data as well as algorithms and models. Finally, wireless networks will essentially be able to think.

Ma Hongbo noted, “Currently, autonomous driving networks in the field of mobile communications are between the L2 and L3 levels. Achieving fully autonomous control networks requires the joint efforts of all industry stakeholders in terms of level criteria, assessment systems and application collaboration. Huawei will continue to work with operators and industry partners to innovate SMART and enable autonomous networks. “

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Huawei Ma Hongbo: 5GB SMART, bringing wireless networks into the intelligent and autonomous era https://throughwalls.net/huawei-ma-hongbo-5gb-smart-bringing-wireless-networks-into-the-intelligent-and-autonomous-era/ Thu, 14 Oct 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://throughwalls.net/huawei-ma-hongbo-5gb-smart-bringing-wireless-networks-into-the-intelligent-and-autonomous-era/ [Dubai, the UAE, October 14, 2021] Ma Hongbo, President of Huawei Wireless SingleOSS Product Line, delivered a keynote address titled “5GB SMART, Ushering Wireless Networks into the Intelligent and Autonomous Era” at the 4th Wireless Autonomous Driving Network Industry Forum . The forum was held as part of the 12th Global Mobile Broadband Forum. In […]]]>

[Dubai, the UAE, October 14, 2021] Ma Hongbo, President of Huawei Wireless SingleOSS Product Line, delivered a keynote address titled “5GB SMART, Ushering Wireless Networks into the Intelligent and Autonomous Era” at the 4th Wireless Autonomous Driving Network Industry Forum . The forum was held as part of the 12th Global Mobile Broadband Forum. In his speech, Mr. Ma highlighted the importance of network autonomy for 5G operators, predicting five key areas of evolution for wireless networks: Simplified, Maximizing, Agile, Robust and Reflective (5Gb SMART). These changes will result in autonomous driving networks with automated operation and maintenance, ultimate performance and a low carbon footprint.

Five trends for wireless autonomous driving networks

Operators focus on autonomous driving networks

Over the past decade, the evolution of wireless networks has brought new opportunities as well as increased complexity of network OPEX and O&M. With 5G, the mobile communications industry is promoting the concept of autonomous driving networks by integrating wireless networks with intelligence.

During the conference, Mr. Ma explained that operators are gradually and hierarchically implementing autonomous driving networks as a basic strategy. In fact, according to a study conducted by TMF Autonomous Networks in 2021, more than 80% of 42 operators surveyed independently believe they will deploy a fully autonomous driving network at scale in the next decade.

5Go SMART: five trends for wireless autonomous driving networks

Wireless autonomous driving networks will integrate both network and site intelligence, developing independent intelligence processes and gradually evolving towards intelligent autonomy.

Trend 1 GB Simplified: Network construction will become smarter and simpler throughout its lifecycle. Intelligence will be introduced into sites, facilitating intelligent detection and simplified site configuration, much like adding “eyes” and a “brain”. The intelligence of networks and base stations will work together to adapt to a variety of contexts, resulting in self-configuration of the network and intelligent acceptance of ancillary sites. Ultimately, the entire network construction lifecycle will be simplified.

Trend 2 Go Maximizing: Vertical collaboration will maximize the potential of the network. Intelligence will also be introduced into the air interface, along with the use of technologies, such as channel graph and planning dictionary, for more flexible resource planning and spectrum decoupling, thereby maximizing the performance of the network. ‘one site. The network will use 3D beam planning and intelligent parameter optimization to maximize performance across all frequency bands. Along with improving performance and experience, the network will balance and maximize nnetwork energy efficiency using energy saving technologies at the site, device and network layers.

3 GB Agile Trend: The whole process of 5G services will become more agile. Today, every industry requires better network construction and maintenance than in the past. Thus, intelligence will be introduced in the planning, construction, maintenance and optimization phases of toB networks. This will result in automatic translation of service intentions, precise intelligent network planning and proactive service assurance, making 5GtoB service deployment more agile.

Trend 4 Go Robust: 5G networks will become more reliable. Intelligence capabilities, such as self-learning of fault functions and intelligent analysis of time sequences, will be introduced to implement precise fault identification and intelligent root cause analysis. This will turn manual troubleshooting into automatic, implement failure prediction and prevention, shift from passive response to proactive maintenance, improve network robustness, and ultimately create more reliable 5G networks.

5 Go Thinking trend: 5G networks will be able to “think”. Together, site and network intelligence will become the basis for wireless autonomous driving networks. Base stations will gradually become intelligent, creating digital twins. They will also have a per-device federated learning capability to add intelligence to each terminal. The powerful computing capacity of the wireless intelligent engine will be able to self-learn and self-evolve using massive network data as well as algorithms and models. Finally, wireless networks will essentially be able to think.

Ma Hongbo noted, “Currently, autonomous driving networks in the field of mobile communications are between the L2 and L3 levels. To achieve fully autonomous control networks, the joint efforts of all industry players are needed in terms of level criteria, evaluation systems and application collaboration. . Huawei will continue to work with operators and industry partners to innovate SMART and enable autonomous networks. “

The 12th Global Mobile Broadband Forum offers the opportunity for mobile and adjacent vertical ecosystems to reconnect, rebuild and reinvent a smart, fully connected world. Topics currently under discussion with global partners range from maximizing the potential of 5G, including industry use cases and applications, to advancing the mobile future.

For more information, please visit: https://www.huawei.com/en/events/mbbf2021


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How could wireless networks be scaled to meet IoT demand? https://throughwalls.net/how-could-wireless-networks-be-scaled-to-meet-iot-demand/ Tue, 12 Oct 2021 13:33:03 +0000 https://throughwalls.net/how-could-wireless-networks-be-scaled-to-meet-iot-demand/ fantasy1 / Pixabay We hear a lot about the value of the Internet of Things (IoT) in use cases like sustainable smart cities, manufacturing, and agriculture. Get our activist investing case study! Get the full 10-part series on our in-depth study on activist investing in PDF. Save it to your desktop, read it on your […]]]>
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We hear a lot about the value of the Internet of Things (IoT) in use cases like sustainable smart cities, manufacturing, and agriculture.

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Letters, conferences and more on hedge funds in the third quarter of 2021

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currenciesGrantia Capital specializes in quantitative investing using a statistical arbitrage strategy. The company offers a statistical FX arbitrage strategy with different formats or vehicles. Grantia aims to protect each position against extreme market movements, which the company says has earned it an exceptional success rate. Letters, conferences and others on hedge funds in Q3 2021 Creation of Ignacio Garrido Read more

Sensors and automation can use energy and other resources more efficiently, reduce reliance on human intervention, and deliver valuable data and information while doing so.

In light of the urgent need to tackle climate change and enhance food and water security, it is worth asking why the current pace of development appears to be slowing, even when the technology is available and relatively cheap.

We spoke with Nodle co-founder Micha Benoliel about this and other aspect of IoT and the hurdles this technology has to overcome.

Despite the growing adoption of IoT, why aren’t we seeing more smart cities, smart factories, and smart farms?

The problem is simple. The existing infrastructure simply cannot meet the growing demand for connectivity. 5G networks are touted as the solution to our insatiable demand for high-speed internet, but even older, slower cellular services offer spotty coverage at best.

Even in the richest countries, people in small villages or remote areas often struggle to connect.

Nodle has designed a network that offers permanent connectivity via Bluetooth Low Energy. What can you share about this project?

Nodle provides constant connectivity to nearly 30 million IoT devices worldwide. It can provide coverage even in the most remote areas where other cellular or WiFi connections are not available.

It is important to say that Nodle is not a WiFi network in the traditional sense. Rather, it is a global network infrastructure that leverages the Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) standard to connect any BLE device to the Internet.

Today, more than 50% of all IoT devices on the market have a Bluetooth Low Energy (BLE) wireless interface. Using the Standard Generic Attribute Protocol (GATT), any of these devices can interact with any Nodle edge node.

Clearly, this means that any Bluetooth compatible smartphone can be transformed into a node on the Nodle network. The network itself is 100% software and leverages everyone’s smartphones through a simple app or SDK to turn them into an edge node.

What is the role of blockchain in the development of IoT in this type of technology?

Blockchain provides the necessary incentives for people to join the network. To increase the adoption and growth of the network using smartphones, we needed an incentive mechanism and a way to secure communications.

With blockchain, people can earn token-based rewards based on transactions recorded on the chain. In addition to recording all the transactions that occur on the network, the chain offers a way to create IoT applications and smart contracts to automate the invoicing process.

Thus, effectively, an IoT device can remain “offline” until it comes within range of a connected smartphone. Once within range, the IoT device can send its data to the network using the Bluetooth connection. It sounds deceptively simple, but such a network has compelling use cases.

Could these blockchain-based incentives be a basis for Web3?

Web3 is a significant revolution in the way applications and services are built. In Web3, everything is built with a decentralized approach. This means systems with more privacy, more resilient infrastructures, and less censorship.

Web3 services have a native blockchain-based payment layer. It allows the creation of stand-alone, unauthorized, untrustworthy and verifiable systems.

This is a big improvement over Web 2.0 where the primary business model was to scale up and then monetize an audience. Web3 enables new ecosystems with for example the possibility of providing incentives to all parties involved.

In terms of Web3 and the future of services such as connectivity, cloud storage or computing capacity, is it likely that eventually all networks will be decentralized?

I think we have seen the limits of centralized networks and services. This is very visible when it comes to protecting people’s privacy. However, it is much more difficult to scale decentralized networks than to operate a centralized network from a technological point of view. It will take time, but decentralization is the way to go.

It will allow a great change for our society. It means building a whole new infrastructure to enable abundance. It is helping to change the state of mind of scarcity that has so far guided our economies towards the state of mind of abundance.

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an unusual metamaterial could double the capacity of wireless networks ► FINCHANNEL https://throughwalls.net/an-unusual-metamaterial-could-double-the-capacity-of-wireless-networks-%e2%96%ba-finchannel/ Tue, 28 Sep 2021 07:07:22 +0000 https://throughwalls.net/an-unusual-metamaterial-could-double-the-capacity-of-wireless-networks-%e2%96%ba-finchannel/ Your office wall can play a role in the next generation of wireless communications. University of Toronto researchers George Eleftheriades and Sajjad Taravati have shown that reflectors made of metamaterials can channel light to allow more data to be transmitted wirelessly on a single frequency. They believe this newly realized property – called “full duplex […]]]>

Your office wall can play a role in the next generation of wireless communications. University of Toronto researchers George Eleftheriades and Sajjad Taravati have shown that reflectors made of metamaterials can channel light to allow more data to be transmitted wirelessly on a single frequency.

They believe this newly realized property – called “full duplex non-reciprocity” – could double the capacity of existing wireless networks. Their research is published in an article in Nature Communications.

“It’s happening,” says Eleftheriades, professor in the Edward S. Rogers Sr. Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Faculty of Applied Sciences and Engineering.

“In the next three to five years, this technology will be adopted. “

Intellectual property for the team’s proof of concept was recently transferred to Montreal-based startup LATYS Intelligence Inc., co-founded by U of T Engineering alumnus Gursimran Singh Sethi.

Metamaterials are man-made structures made up of building blocks that are smaller than the wavelengths of light they are designed to manipulate.

The material used by the team consists of repeating unit cells of approximately 20 millimeters. They appear to form a homogeneous object – a metasurface – for longer wavelengths of light such as microwaves, which are used to carry signals from cell phones and reflect off the metasurface exhibiting a property known as of non-reciprocity.

Eleftheriades uses a car’s rear view mirror to illustrate how it works.

“When you drive and look in the rearview mirror, you see the driver behind you. This driver can also see you because the light bounces off the rearview mirror and follows the same path to the rear, ”he says.

“What is unusual about non-reciprocity is that the incident angle and the reflected angle are not equal. To be precise, the return path of the wave is different.

“Basically you can see somebody, but you can’t be seen.”

Additionally, metamaterials allow you to direct and amplify incoming beams, which is useful in many applications, from medical imaging and solar panels to satellite communications and even emerging camouflage technology.

By adding the ability to direct the reflective beam, smart new metasurfaces could significantly mark wireless communication, according to Eleftheriades.

“In everyday experience, a microwave emitted by a tower reaches its intended end point, like a modem, and then returns to the telecommunication station,” he says. “That’s why when you have a conversation on your cell phone, you don’t speak and listen on the same channel. If you did, the signals would interfere and you wouldn’t be able to separate your own voice from that of your partner.

Today’s 5G networks only have “half-duplex” links. Essentially, the 5G signal uses slightly different frequencies, or the same frequency but at a slightly different time, to avoid interference. The delay is imperceptible to the user.

On the other hand, the full-duplex architecture developed by Eleftheriades and Taravati, post-doctoral researcher, allows speaking and listening on the same channel at the same time.

Unlike other metamaterial technologies, it spatially separates the forward and backward paths within the same frequency, thus doubling the capacity of the system.

Although full-duplex functionality exists in a limited capacity in military-grade radars, it is currently not suitable for consumer applications such as mobile devices. This is because the current full duplex transceivers are made of large and expensive structures including ferrite materials and polarization magnets to manipulate the beam.

“We offer a completely different mechanism,” explains Elefthreriades. “No magnets or ferrites. Everything is done using printed circuits and silicon electronic components such as transistors.

The wide applicability of these smart metasurfaces is what excited the LATYS development team.

“Tunable asymmetric radiation beams in both receive and transmit states have incredible potential to address some of the wireless communications industry’s most pressing and significant challenges,” said Sethi. “By spatially decoupling the receive and transmit paths, we can create ‘true full-duplex systems’ that can support two-way communication at the same time and at the same frequency.

“This will allow LATYS products and prototypes to have an edge over the competition and a lot of traction, especially in radio-hostile environments such as industrial automation, IIOT [Industrial Internet of Things] and 5G applications.

Professor Deepa Kundur, chair of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, says the relationship between University of Toronto engineering researchers and the business community is important.

“It’s a good illustration of one of the many ways that engineering progresses,” she says. “A revolutionary proof of concept, like that of Professor Eleftheriades and Taravati, paves the way for better technology – and industry then takes over. “

By Matthieu Tierney


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Cloud operator needs 5G wireless networks, other drivers of success https://throughwalls.net/cloud-operator-needs-5g-wireless-networks-other-drivers-of-success/ Tue, 14 Sep 2021 01:40:18 +0000 https://throughwalls.net/cloud-operator-needs-5g-wireless-networks-other-drivers-of-success/ All of the wonderful software-based efforts that we hear about clearly need something for software to work: an efficient, software-centric, hardware-based cloud setup, which we call the cloud operator. Almost anything on carrier transformation goal lists can be done with carrier cloud, but the big question really is how carrier cloud will be deployed in […]]]>

All of the wonderful software-based efforts that we hear about clearly need something for software to work: an efficient, software-centric, hardware-based cloud setup, which we call the cloud operator. Almost anything on carrier transformation goal lists can be done with carrier cloud, but the big question really is how carrier cloud will be deployed in the first place.

We have transition strategies for 5G wireless integrated current wireless deployments, but there is currently no significant operator cloud deployment. So how will carriers achieve this and what infrastructure should they operate? The answer is that 5G can play a role, and that role could accelerate the global software-based cloud transformation. While 5G may be the primary driver, other short-term drivers can help get the job done.

The virtual network model that is evolving today is totally different from the device and trunk model we have today. A rich fiber transport layer connects data centers which can host not only network layer – IP and Ethernet – functionalities, but also other characteristics, functions and even applications. Virtual junctions can be threaded through the fiber layer to create many different topologies even at the same time. And cases of virtual network functions and features can be expanded to adapt to changes in traffic. This is the vision of the carrier cloud.

One of the reasons the cloud operator plays a role in 5G deployment stories so often is that 5G networks are designed to be segmented into layers of parallel services, also known as network slicing. Each slice acts almost like an independent network, with its own elements of subscriber and traffic management; however, some slices can share components, if necessary. Obviously, moving switches, routers, and mobile devices to accommodate the creation of ad hoc network slices is impractical, so a full 5G implementation requires an extended virtual network. Without a cloud operator, you cannot access full 5G.

The big question has not been whether 5G requires the use of the cloud operator, but whether it can justify it. 5G calls for a new radio network – 5G NR – new handsets and new infrastructure. In an age of highly competitive wireless and unlimited use, it is unknown whether 5G will somehow generate new customers. Otherwise, it can’t generate a lot of additional revenue and it can’t help build a cloud for operators.

Streaming, competition can boost the operator cloud

Without a cloud operator, you cannot access full 5G.

Besides 5G, there are two short-term cloud drivers to consider. The first is video streaming. While many have proposed the Internet of Things to justify the explosion in the need for 5G, the fact is IoT does not currently rely on cellular service at all, and may never be. The main benefit of 5G today is primarily its ability to support more high-speed wireless traffic, and the most credible source of this traffic is video streaming.

For a decade now, mobile video consumption has increased rapidly, demanding higher capacity connections for mobile users. This imposes the total capacity of 4G cells and, therefore, encourages operators to look for ways to get more bandwidth per cell, as well as more bandwidth per user. The past growth of mobile video may be pale compared to future growth rates, as watching live or real-time programming grows even faster than streaming in general. Live video, especially sporting events, generates multiple synchronized viewing requirements that can easily overwhelm today’s mobile networks.

The live broadcast of TV programs is also affecting wired video, where most of the operators that provide traditional TV services are feeling the effects of Cut the rope and switch to streaming over wired broadband at home. The increased need for wired bandwidth is prompting operators to explore the combination of 5G millimeter wave radio and fiber to the node to serve urban and suburban neighborhoods instead of fiber to the home or ADSL. Some operators even believe that a form of 5G technology, called consumer fixed wireless broadband, could enable residential broadband competition without extensive copper or fiber, opening up new competitive opportunities outside their home regions.

Live video streaming requires extremely efficient content caching to reduce the impact on wireless link and metro infrastructure. Live streaming offers operators the opportunity to improve ad targeting and ad revenue generation, but only if ad selection and insertion can be managed effectively. Early users of the live streaming service said that ads were often launched late in the insert window or even missed completely, and ads suffered from buffering interruptions more often than TV shows.

The second driver of 5G in the carrier cloud is the competitive climate in the telecommunications industry. To be considered market leaders, operators are forced to adopt 5G. But in addition, operators are turning more to mobile virtual network operator agreements with other network and cable operators, handset operators like Apple and even cloud companies like Google – which already offers a service. MVNO – Amazon and Microsoft. Mergers and acquisitions in the mobile space make MVNO transactions more important for players who want to own mobile users.

Network slicing is a 5G feature which not only facilitates independent MVNO transactions, but also provides a way to separate home or mobile video streaming from emerging real-time applications such as IoT. In fact, some operators believe that growing interest in MVNO partners would prompt them to deploy virtual mobile elements in the operator’s cloud even before the full 5G Core specifications that include network slicing are adopted. Could mean carrier cloud would be useful even in 5G-over-4G non-autonomous deployments (NSA) – which means using the new 5G radio without the new 5G core – is already seeing engagement from early adopters.

How wireless 5G can meet certain technological missions

5G, political connotation of the operator’s cloud

The final relationship between 5G and the cloud operator is political. Operators have budgeted for 5G to a greater extent than for other transformative technologies, such as software defined network Where network functions virtualization. It’s easier to introduce new technology where funding is already approved than to create new projects and then try to get them.

Most operators believe the cloud operator is essential for the transformation, which is the shift of operators from a pure connectivity service business model to one that includes hosting experiences in a way normally offered by on top suppliers. While 5G alone cannot drive the carrier cloud, it can be combined with other pilots to do just that and support the ultimate goals of transformation.


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Understand the basics of 5G wireless networks https://throughwalls.net/understand-the-basics-of-5g-wireless-networks/ Fri, 10 Sep 2021 11:14:37 +0000 https://throughwalls.net/understand-the-basics-of-5g-wireless-networks/ Wireless networks have improved dramatically in recent years, with businesses accepting an increasing number of mobile devices accessing their networks. The telecommunications industry hopes fifth generation wireless technology will represent an even greater leap in network performance, allowing businesses to tap into a wide range of new services and applications. What is 5G? Building on […]]]>

Wireless networks have improved dramatically in recent years, with businesses accepting an increasing number of mobile devices accessing their networks. The telecommunications industry hopes fifth generation wireless technology will represent an even greater leap in network performance, allowing businesses to tap into a wide range of new services and applications.

What is 5G?

Building on the long-term evolution of fourth-generation wireless (LTE) services, 5G wireless is expected to carry greater amounts of data over much faster network speeds with less than millisecond latency. At the peak performance of 4G, cellular networks can carry data at speeds of up to 1 Gbps. With 5G wireless networks, however, performance will increase dramatically as data travels at faster speeds; as fast as 10 Gbps – equivalent to wired speeds.

The reduction in network response times heralds other significant advances. As a result, the 5G architecture has significant potential for new technologies – such as remote online surgery – which encompass machine learning and artificial intelligence, virtual and augmented reality, and internet of things.

Types of 5G wireless services and how they work

As the commercial deployment of 5G wireless networks draws closer, mobile operators prepare to roll out two main types of new 5G services. The first is fixed wireless broadband, which will be available in some major metropolitan areas in 2018. The second is 5G mobile cellular, which is expected to be available in select markets in 2019, with technology for mobile and cellular users becoming widely available. . in 2020. Analysts expect operators to 5G wireless deployment in place by 2025.

Here’s how the two types of 5G wireless services work.

Fixed 5G wireless broadband. These services are designed to provide last mile Internet connectivity to a business or residence using radio signals, rather than a wired connection directly to the premises. To provide fixed wireless broadband, operators are deploying new 5G radios in small cell sites, such as street lights and telephone poles, to transmit signals to wireless modems installed inside buildings and homes. . This replaces the need for fibers, cables or other wired connections directly to a building.

The 3rd generation partnership project (3GPP) in December 2017 completed the standards for the new 5G radio required for fixed broadband wireless.

5G mobile services. Operators also plan to offer 5G mobile cellular services, which will be made possible by the upcoming development of Evolved Package Core LTE-Advanced wireless connectivity. 5G cellular mobile services cannot be deployed until 3GPP completes 5G mobile baseline standards, which is expected later this year, and until 5G-enabled smartphones are commercially available. – expected in early 2019. Analysts expect mobile operators to start rolling out 5G. mobile service towards the end of the first quarter of 2019.

5G wireless in the enterprise

The full promise of 5G wireless technology For businesses, this remains a promise until the development of 5G standards is complete and operators are finished deploying 5G wireless networks. Once 5G radios are installed and 5G-enabled smart devices become available, expect businesses to grow further. 5G service use cases.

Chris Antlitz, senior telecommunications analyst at Technology Business Research Inc. in Hampton, NH, said he expects large Fortune 2000 companies to be among the first to deploy 5G services, starting in 2020. The more widespread adoption of businesses will begin later. in the decade – between 2025 and 2030.

To prepare for the 5G deployment wireless networks, some companies start appointing C suite leaders and other IT managers to examine potential applications that can take advantage of 5G performance and low latency.

Who will benefit from 5G?

The 5G infrastructure market is set to grow significantly, from $ 2.9 billion in 2020 to $ 34 billion by 2026, according to Markets and Markets, fueled by the demand for mobile data services, the growth of industrial automation and the increased use of software in communications networks.

For industries that require low latency and high throughput, such as healthcare, financial services, energy, and other field service organizations, 5G wireless networks are expected to have a significant impact. Businesses with specialized communication requirements and manufacturing processes might benefit first.

Engineers at a 5G development center in Oulu, Finland, where Nokia was once the dominant employer, develop 5G use case. Researchers are working on communication ideas such as 5G radio broadcasting, as well as developing healthcare applications, such as stroke rehabilitation through virtual reality.

Service providers contribute to the development of 5G

According to TBR, more than 85% of funds for 5G development come from communication service providers in four countries: the United States, China, Japan and South Korea. Operators in these countries have made 5G a priority and are initially focusing on fixed wireless broadband and mobile broadband.

In the United States, Verizon and AT&T, which started 5G trials in some cities in 2017, are building 5G networks that use millimeter wave spectrum when rolling out their services in 2018. Sprint and T-Mobile announced their intention to offer 5G mobile services in major metropolitan areas in 2019.

US carriers have regulatory hurdles to overcome in deploying 5G wireless networks. Federal and state regulations on access to rights of way must be established and local permits issued allowing telecommunications companies to install the fiber they need to connect to their small cell sites. Suppliers will also have to purchase spectrum through auctions managed by the Federal Communications Commission.

Through low-latency, high-speed data delivery, 5G wireless networks promise to change the way businesses use advanced technologies to support new services and capabilities. Businesses can expect adoption to accelerate over the coming decade, as service providers begin to roll out 5G services and businesses develop 5G use cases.


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